COVID keeps nonprofits struggling to keep up with increasing demand

Through the economic crisis. AND NO PROFITS, INCLUDING MARYLAND FOOD BANK, SAY THEY ARE FIGHTING TO KEEP. AIXA DIAZ HAS MORE FROM WASHINGTON TODAY. AIXA: THE MARYLAND FOOD BANK IS GOING ON A SERIOUS SHOPPING TREE OUT OF NEED. >> WE PURCHASED SOME $ 19 MILLION OF FOOD, ALMOST 400% MORE THAN WE WOULD USUALLY SPEND IN THE LAST SIX MONTHS. AIXA: Storage of the shelves was critical and costly in this pandemic. MORE FAMILIES ARE WITH FOOD INSECURITY. AND TO YOUR LOCAL SOUP KITCHENS AND FOOD PANTRIES. >> HERE IN MARYLAND, WITH THIS PANDEMIC, WE ESTIMATE THAT IN EVERY THREE PEOPLE IS FOOD UNSAFE. So, when you think about your daily routine and know how many people you interact with during the course of a day, you can get over people struggling to put food on the table for their families. AIXA: And the need goes beyond food. MARY & # 39; S CENTER A COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER IN THE DC METRO AREA SAYS IT IS GETTING AN INCREASE FROM UNINSURED PATIENTS Seeking Free Or Reduced Health Care. >> IN ADDITION, WE SEE PATIENTS WHO ARE TRAVELING FROM FURTHER TRAVELS TO USE OUR SERVICES BECAUSE OTHER HEALTH CARE SERVICES HAVE CLOSED THEIR DOORS. AIXA: And that's the fear. THESE NONPROFITS WILL TERMINATE ESSENTIAL SERVICES AT A TIME WHICH SO MANY AMERICANS NEED HELP. >> THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT ON MANY COMMUNITIES IS ONLY R.

Nonprofits are struggling to keep up with rising demand in the face of the coronavirus pandemic

Due to a pandemic, there are fewer personal volunteers. nonprofits are the most in need of financial donations

Updated: 10:23 PM EST November 21, 2020

Washington Bureau reporter

Nonprofits are struggling to keep up with demand in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. || Coronavirus updates | Maryland's latest numbers | Where to get tested || With thousands of Americans unemployed, more and more people are turning to community health centers and food banks to help weather the economic crisis. The Maryland Food Bank took some serious shopping out of necessity. "We bought approximately $ 19 million worth of groceries, nearly 400% more than we would normally have spent in the last six months," said Carmen Del Guercio, president and CEO of Maryland Food Bank. and expensive – during the pandemic. More and more families are faced with food insecurity and turn to their local soup kitchens and pantries. "Here in Maryland, an estimated one in three people is food unsafe in this pandemic," Del Guercio said. "So when you think about your daily routine and how many people you interact with during the day, you run into people who have difficulty putting food on the table for their families." The need goes beyond the food. Mary & # 39; s Center, a community health center in the DC area, said the number of uninsured patients seeking free or low-cost healthcare is increasing. "We also see patients traveling further afield to use our services because other healthcare facilities have closed their doors," said Heather Morgan, development director at Mary's Center. There is fear that at a time when so many Americans are in need of help, more nonprofits will stop providing basic services. "The socio-economic impact on many communities is only very profound," Morgan said. And because of the pandemic, there are fewer in-person volunteers, but nonprofits said they are in need of financial donations the most.

Nonprofits are struggling to keep up with demand in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

|| Coronavirus updates | Maryland's latest numbers | Where to get tested ||

With thousands of Americans unemployed, more and more people are turning to community health centers and food banks to help weather the economic crisis.

The Maryland Food Bank went on some serious shopping out of necessity.

"We purchased $ 19 million worth of groceries, nearly 400% more than we would normally have spent in the last six months," said Carmen Del Guercio, president and CEO of Maryland Food Bank.

Stocking the shelves was critical – and costly – during the pandemic. More and more families are faced with food insecurity and turn to their local soup kitchens and pantries.

"Here in Maryland, with this pandemic, it is estimated that one in three people is food unsafe," said Del Guercio. "So when you think about your daily routine and how many people you interact with during a day, you run into people who struggle to put food on the table for their families."

The need goes beyond the food. The Mary & # 39; s Center, a community health center in the DC area, announced that the number of uninsured patients seeking free or low-cost healthcare is increasing.

"We also see patients traveling from further afield to use our services because other healthcare facilities have closed their doors," said Heather Morgan, development director at Mary's Center.

There is a fear that at a time when so many Americans are in need of help, more nonprofits will stop providing basic services.

"The socio-economic impact on many communities is really profound," said Morgan.

And because of the pandemic, there are fewer personal volunteers, but nonprofits said they need financial donations the most.

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