interactive map, case data, helpful links

>> YOU MAY HAVE TO BITE THE BULLET AND SACRIFICE THAT SOCIAL GATHERING UNLESS YOU ARE PRETTY CERTAIN THAT THE PEOPLE THAT YOU ARE DEALING WITH ARE NOT INFECTED. JASON: THAT WAS THE COUNTRY’S TOP INFECTIOUS DISEASE EXPERT WARNING PEOPLE AGAINST CELEBRATING THE HOLIDAY TOGETHER AS THE U.S. BRACES FOR A POSSIBLE SECOND WAVE OF THE CORONAVIRUS. WE TALKED ABOUT HOW YOU CAN KEEP YOURSELF AND FAMILY SAFE DURING THE HOLIDAYS AND WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR AS WE GET FURTHER INTO THE FALL. DR. SHEF IS JOINING US AGAIN. LET’S JUMP IN RIGHT NOW. WE ARE GETTING CLOSE TO THE HOLIDAYS. DR. FAUCI SAID, LISTEN, IF YOU CAN KEE THE NUMBERS DOWN IN YOUR HOUSE, IT WOULD BE ADVANTAGEOUS. IS THAT THE WAY WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT HOLIDAYS NOW? >> DEFINITELY. FOR THE FOR SEEABLE FUTURE, AS THE PANDEMIC HAS GONE ON, EVERYBODY HAS CREATED THEIR OWN BUBBLES. WHEN YOU HAVE THE HOLIDAYS, PEOPLE WANT TO EXPAND IT. SO MANY STORIES COME OUT THAT THESE SMALL HOUSING EVENTS BECOME SUPER SPREADERS. THE LAST THING YOU WANT IS FOR SOMEONE TO VISIT, AND THEN EVERYBODY GETS SICK. JASON: TELL ME ABOUT THE IDEA OF A SECOND WAVE. YOU ARE SEEING SOME EUROPEAN CITIES THAT HAVE BEEN QUIET BUT NOW FRANCE IS DEALING WITH A CURFEW, LONDON IS GETTING MORE STRICT. DOES THAT MAKE THIS IDEA OF A SECOND WAVE REAL? >> DEFINITELY. ESPECIALLY IN PLACES IN PARTS OF EUROPE WHERE AS THINGS HAVE OPENED UP, THEY HAVE HAD PEOPLE MORE INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER, AND THAT IS CAUSING A SECOND WAVE, AND LIKELY PEOPLE ARE BEING MORE INDOORS BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER. THAT IS HAPPENING IN THE U.S. FOR US, IT IS NOT REALLY A SECOND WAVE. WE NEVER STOPPED THE FIRST WAVE. IT HAS BEEN A CONTINUATION. THINGS PLATEAUED FOR A LITTLE BIT. JASON: WHAT SHOULD OUR THINKING BE? I HAVE BEEN TO THE GROCERY STORE. I HAVE DRIVEN BY THE MALL. SHOULD WE KEEP GOING THE WAY WE ARE AND TRYING TO BE CAUTIOUS? SHOULD WE START THINKING ABOUT PULLING BACK? >> I THINK WE ARE GOING TO HAVE TO START THINKING ABOUT PULLING BACK A LITTLE BIT. HONESTLY, PEOPLE ARE JUST TIRED, WHICH SHOULD MAKE SENSE, BUT AT THE SAME TIME, YOU HAVE TO STAY VIGILANT. IF WE CONTINUE TO DO WHAT WE ARE DOING NOW, THE NUMBERS ARE NOT GOING TO GO DOWN. JASON: LET’S TALK ABOUT POSITIVITY RATES. EVERY TIME IT COMES UP, THERE IS SOME CONFUSION. INDIVIDUAL — NOT THE NUMBERS OF TESTS THEY HAD TAKEN. I THINK THE POSITIVITY RATE IS MORE REFLECTIVE OF WHAT JOHNS HOPKINS IS PUTTING OUT THERE. JASON: I WANT TO GET YOUR THOUGHTS, SOME YOUNGER KIDS ARE GOING TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL, PRE-K TO FIRST GRADE. THE IDEA IS THAT THEY ARE LEAST LIKELY TO GET SICK. IF I AM SENDING A KID, WHAT SHOULD I SEND THEM WITH? >> DEFINITELY HAND SANITIZER, MASKS, AND I KNOW IT IS HARD, BUT KIDS ARE SMARTER THAN WE GIVE THEM CREDIT FOR. WE NEED TO BE TRUTHFUL. TELL THEM THERE IS A DANGEROUS VIRUS. THEY ARE PROBABLY USED TO PLAYING WITH OTHER KIDS AND TOUCHING ONE ANOTHER. THEY HAVE TO KEEP THEIR HANDS TO THEMSELVES AND HAVE THEIR OWN PERSONAL PROPERTY. WE ALWAYS ENCOURAGE SHARING, BUT RIGHT NOW, WE SHOULD HOLD OFF. ONE THING TO ADD, WE KEEP TALKING ABOUT THE VACCINE, HOW HOPEFULLY THAT WILL CHANGE MOVING FOR. THE BIGGEST THING PEOPLE DO NOT REALIZE IS THERE HAS NOT BEEN ANYTHING TESTED YET IN KIDS. WE TALK ABOUT OPENING THINGS UP AGAIN, BUT THE VACCINE IS NOT GOING TO MAKE THINGS 100% NORMAL. THE VACCINATION FOR KIDS DOES NOT EXIST YET. WE ARE JUST STARTING RIGHT NOW. I DON’T THINK EVERYBODY REALIZES THAT. JASON: STAY CAREFUL. WATCH YOUR HANDS. WEAR T

Coronavirus in Maryland: interactive map, case data, helpful links

Updated: 10:12 AM EST Nov 22, 2020

Don’t see interactive map/graphs? Tap hereWhat’s New: Week of Nov. 16, 2020More than 11 million people in the country have been infected with the virus and more than 246,000 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.Moderna said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine is proving to be highly effective in a major trial, a second dash of hope in the global race for a shot to tame a resurgent virus that is now killing more than 8,000 people a day worldwide.With winter right around the corner and coronavirus cases spiking in many areas across the country, mental health is a great concern for both the young and old.By the numbers: Sunday, Nov. 22Number of confirmed cases : 182,139Number of persons tested negative : 2,043,250Total testing volume : 4,140,727Number of confirmed deaths : 4,279Number of probable deaths : 155Currently hospitalized : 1,237Acute care : 969Intensive care : 268Ever hospitalized : 19,636Released from isolation : 8,506Statewide positivity rate (MDH): 6.82%More MDH data: Nursing home cases | School outbreaks | Contact tracing dataCases and Deaths Data Breakdown Note: Parenthesis = Number of confirmed deaths Asterisk = Number of probable deathsNH = Non-HispanicCASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY COUNTY: Allegany 2,421 (52) Anne Arundel 15,471 (282) 12*Baltimore City 22,699 (520) 20*Baltimore County 26,967 (679) 24*Calvert 1,468 (30) 1*Caroline 869 (9) Carroll 3,020 (131) 3*Cecil 1,857 (37) 1*Charles 4,025 (102) 2*Dorchester 961 (15) Frederick 6,139 (137) 9*Garrett 496 (3) Harford 5,461 (85) 5*Howard 7,398 (128) 6*Kent 404 (24) 2*Montgomery 31,176 (889) 42*Prince George’s 38,699 (882) 25*Queen Anne’s 1,010 (26) 1*St. Mary’s 1,935 (61) Somerset 742 (8) Talbot 749 (7) Washington 3,601 (59) Wicomico 3,148 (55) Worcester 1,423 (34) 1*Data not available (24) 1*CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY AGE:0-9 7,429 10-19 16,176 (3) 20-29 34,704 (26) 1*30-39 32,691 (53) 6*40-49 28,709 (139) 3*50-59 26,824 (349) 17*60-69 17,793 (685) 14*70-79 10,249 (1,067) 31*80+ 7,564 (1,955) 83*Data not available (2) CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY GENDER:Female 95,843 (2,091) 78*Male 86,296 (2,188) 77*CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY RACE AND ETHNICITY:African-American (NH) 54,785 (1,702) 58*Asian (NH) 3,546 (157) 6*White (NH) 53,248 (1,869) 77*Hispanic 35,805 (476) 13*Other (NH) 8,353 (48) Data not available 26,402 (27) 1*ZIP CODES WITH HIGHEST CASE COUNTS:20783 – Adelphi: 3,472 cases20906 – Aspen Hill: 3,334 cases21224 – Baltimore: 2,724 cases20902 – Wheaton/Glenmont: 2,505 cases20706 – Lanham: 2,352 casesMore ZIP codes hereHELPFUL LINKSJohns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering Coronavirus TrackerMaryland Department of Health coronavirus updates | en Español Baltimore City coronavirus resources | City coronavirus dataSCAMS: Beware of fraud related to coronavirusSPECIAL: Late-breaking updates on coronavirusGET TESTED: Where and how to get tested for coronavirus in Maryland SCHOOL DASHBOARDS: Carroll | City | Baltimore CountyMARYLAND COVID-19 TIMELINE IN BRIEFMaryland Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency March 5 after the three people tested positive for the coronavirus. The number of confirmed cases would only continue to rise, and Maryland’s first coronavirus-related death came in March.The state ordered schools to close March 16, and they have remained closed since. Lawmakers in Annapolis adjourned two days later, and Maryland’s presidential primary was moved to June.On March 23, the governor ordered nonessential businesses to close. A week later, he issued a stay-home order.The governor eased some stay-home restrictions May 7 to allow for some outdoor activities to resume, but schools would remain closed through the rest of the academic year.The stay-home order was lifted May 15, but not every county reopened. Then, the state began to enter Stage Two of the recovery plan on June 5 with more restrictions lifted on June 12.Hogan put Maryland’s reopening plan on hold on July 29 as coronavirus cases spike in other states. The state issued an out-of-state travel advisory involving nine states and expanded the statewide face mask order.On Aug. 16, Maryland’s coronavirus cases surpassed 100,000. On Aug. 27, Hogan announced that all local school systems are authorized to begin safely reopening. On Sept. 1, the governor announced the state was ready to move into Stage Three of reopening.As a surge of coronavirus cases came in November, the governor announced stricter restrictions would return Nov. 20 for visitations at hospitals and nursing homes, and he reimposed a 50% capacity limit for restaurants and retail.See a comprehensive timeline of the coronavirus in Maryland hereUNEMPLOYMENTApply for unemployment insurance online here, or call 410-949-0022.Click here to access the BEACON applicationIf you have questions about the new application, you can read the DOL’s BEACON One-Stop FAQs.More information: How to apply for unemployment insuranceFOOD STAMPS (SNAP), MEDICAL ASSISTANCE, WICFAQ for SNAP and medical assistance and other social servicesInformation on WIC — nutrition program for women, infants and children, administered through the Maryland Department of HealthFOOD, CASH, MEDICAL, ENERGY, EMERGENCY ASSISTANCESubmit food, cash, energy, emergency and aged/blind/disabled medical assistance applications online via the Department of Human Services website or the MyDHR portal. Medical Assistance applications for families, children and pregnant women should be submitted by visiting the Maryland Health Connection website. Those who need long-term care medical assistance should submit applications, redetermination applications and verifications through the My MDThink Portal. COVID SURVIVORS WEBSITEThe state launched an online registry for those who have recovered from the coronavirus.”Each of the recovered coronavirus patients in Maryland has a story to tell and a role to play in our efforts to save lives and slow the spread of this virus,” Hogan said April 10.COVID CONNECT will serve as a community platform to share experiences and to lend support to others who are coping with the recovery process.VOLUNTEERMarylanders can donate their time and talents by signing up for the Maryland Responds Reserve Medical Corps, donate blood and support local food banks, places of worship and other charitable organizations.SENIOR CITIZENSMaryland is helping to keep families connected with the nation’s first-ever Senior Call Check Program. Participants who are 65 years or older will receive a call every day between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., depending on which time window they choose. If they can’t be reached, officials will call someone designated by the participant to check up on them.To register, call 866-50-CHECK or visit aging.maryland.gov to register.MORE: Maryland coronavirus A-to-Z Resource GuideFAQ: State answers to coronavirus questions (language translations)FACTS: Rumor ControlCoronavirus – What you should knowThe following information is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:What are the signs and symptoms? The following symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure.FeverCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingChillsRepeated shaking with chillsMuscle painHeadacheSore throatNew loss of taste or smellReported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus cases. Know how to protect yourself and othersKnow what to do if you are sickGet more CDC coronavirus information here

Don’t see interactive map/graphs? Tap here

What’s New: Week of Nov. 16, 2020

More than 11 million people in the country have been infected with the virus and more than 246,000 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Moderna said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine is proving to be highly effective in a major trial, a second dash of hope in the global race for a shot to tame a resurgent virus that is now killing more than 8,000 people a day worldwide.

With winter right around the corner and coronavirus cases spiking in many areas across the country, mental health is a great concern for both the young and old.

By the numbers: Sunday, Nov. 22

Number of confirmed cases : 182,139
Number of persons tested negative : 2,043,250
Total testing volume : 4,140,727
Number of confirmed deaths : 4,279
Number of probable deaths : 155
Currently hospitalized : 1,237
Acute care : 969
Intensive care : 268
Ever hospitalized : 19,636
Released from isolation : 8,506

Statewide positivity rate (MDH): 6.82%

More MDH data: Nursing home cases | School outbreaks | Contact tracing data

Cases and Deaths Data Breakdown

Note: Parenthesis = Number of confirmed deaths
Asterisk = Number of probable deaths
NH = Non-Hispanic

CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY COUNTY:

Allegany 2,421 (52)

Anne Arundel 15,471 (282) 12*

Baltimore City 22,699 (520) 20*

Baltimore County 26,967 (679) 24*

Calvert 1,468 (30) 1*

Caroline 869 (9)

Carroll 3,020 (131) 3*

Cecil 1,857 (37) 1*

Charles 4,025 (102) 2*

Dorchester 961 (15)

Frederick 6,139 (137) 9*

Garrett 496 (3)

Harford 5,461 (85) 5*

Howard 7,398 (128) 6*

Kent 404 (24) 2*

Montgomery 31,176 (889) 42*

Prince George’s 38,699 (882) 25*

Queen Anne’s 1,010 (26) 1*

St. Mary’s 1,935 (61)

Somerset 742 (8)

Talbot 749 (7)

Washington 3,601 (59)

Wicomico 3,148 (55)

Worcester 1,423 (34) 1*

Data not available (24) 1*

CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY AGE:

0-9 7,429

10-19 16,176 (3)

20-29 34,704 (26) 1*

30-39 32,691 (53) 6*

40-49 28,709 (139) 3*

50-59 26,824 (349) 17*

60-69 17,793 (685) 14*

70-79 10,249 (1,067) 31*

80+ 7,564 (1,955) 83*

Data not available (2)

CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY GENDER:

Female 95,843 (2,091) 78*

Male 86,296 (2,188) 77*

CASES, (DEATHS) & PROBABLE DEATHS* BY RACE AND ETHNICITY:

African-American (NH) 54,785 (1,702) 58*

Asian (NH) 3,546 (157) 6*

White (NH) 53,248 (1,869) 77*

Hispanic 35,805 (476) 13*

Other (NH) 8,353 (48)

Data not available 26,402 (27) 1*

ZIP CODES WITH HIGHEST CASE COUNTS:

20783 – Adelphi: 3,472 cases

20906 – Aspen Hill: 3,334 cases

21224 – Baltimore: 2,724 cases

20902 – Wheaton/Glenmont: 2,505 cases

20706 – Lanham: 2,352 cases

More ZIP codes here

HELPFUL LINKS

MARYLAND COVID-19 TIMELINE IN BRIEF

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency March 5 after the three people tested positive for the coronavirus. The number of confirmed cases would only continue to rise, and Maryland’s first coronavirus-related death came in March.

The state ordered schools to close March 16, and they have remained closed since. Lawmakers in Annapolis adjourned two days later, and Maryland’s presidential primary was moved to June.

On March 23, the governor ordered nonessential businesses to close. A week later, he issued a stay-home order.

The governor eased some stay-home restrictions May 7 to allow for some outdoor activities to resume, but schools would remain closed through the rest of the academic year.

The stay-home order was lifted May 15, but not every county reopened. Then, the state began to enter Stage Two of the recovery plan on June 5 with more restrictions lifted on June 12.

Hogan put Maryland’s reopening plan on hold on July 29 as coronavirus cases spike in other states. The state issued an out-of-state travel advisory involving nine states and expanded the statewide face mask order.

On Aug. 16, Maryland’s coronavirus cases surpassed 100,000. On Aug. 27, Hogan announced that all local school systems are authorized to begin safely reopening. On Sept. 1, the governor announced the state was ready to move into Stage Three of reopening.

As a surge of coronavirus cases came in November, the governor announced stricter restrictions would return Nov. 20 for visitations at hospitals and nursing homes, and he reimposed a 50% capacity limit for restaurants and retail.

UNEMPLOYMENT

Apply for unemployment insurance online here, or call 410-949-0022.

If you have questions about the new application, you can read the DOL’s BEACON One-Stop FAQs.

More information: How to apply for unemployment insurance

FOOD STAMPS (SNAP), MEDICAL ASSISTANCE, WIC

Information on WIC — nutrition program for women, infants and children, administered through the Maryland Department of Health

FOOD, CASH, MEDICAL, ENERGY, EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

Submit food, cash, energy, emergency and aged/blind/disabled medical assistance applications online via the Department of Human Services website or the MyDHR portal.

Medical Assistance applications for families, children and pregnant women should be submitted by visiting the Maryland Health Connection website. Those who need long-term care medical assistance should submit applications, redetermination applications and verifications through the My MDThink Portal.

COVID SURVIVORS WEBSITE

The state launched an online registry for those who have recovered from the coronavirus.

“Each of the recovered coronavirus patients in Maryland has a story to tell and a role to play in our efforts to save lives and slow the spread of this virus,” Hogan said April 10.

COVID CONNECT will serve as a community platform to share experiences and to lend support to others who are coping with the recovery process.

VOLUNTEER

Marylanders can donate their time and talents by signing up for the Maryland Responds Reserve Medical Corps, donate blood and support local food banks, places of worship and other charitable organizations.

SENIOR CITIZENS

Maryland is helping to keep families connected with the nation’s first-ever Senior Call Check Program. Participants who are 65 years or older will receive a call every day between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., depending on which time window they choose. If they can’t be reached, officials will call someone designated by the participant to check up on them.

To register, call 866-50-CHECK or visit aging.maryland.gov to register.

Coronavirus – What you should know

The following information is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

What are the signs and symptoms? The following symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure.

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus cases.

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