Legal analysts discuss efforts toward impeachment of President Donald Trump

Vice President Mike Pence will not invoke the 25th Amendment, which would start the process of removing President Donald Trump from office.Pence sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Tuesday night.This means the House will move forward with impeachment proceedings Wednesday, making it the first time a president has been impeached twice while in office.Legal and political analysts say this is a situation like we’ve never seen for many reasons and more is at stake here than just a change of power.“This is not a red versus blue moment. This is a we the people moment,” said Kim Wehle, a legal analyst from the University of Baltimore.And a moment that’s never happened before in the history of our country. Wednesday morning, the House of Representatives plan to vote on an article of impeachment against Trump for the second time in his term for inciting insurrection during the attack on the U.S. Capitol last week.Whele said this time is different.“Many prosecutors believe the widespread video evidence, the president’s statement before and after the incident this is not a complicated, and nuanced case unlike the first impeachment,” Wehle said.The first impeachment vote split down party lines, but this time, several Republicans have said they are considering voting in favor of impeachment.“This indicates to us that some of the members of the Republican Party really are probably voting on principle here that they really believe the president did something seriously wrong,” said Roger Hartley, dean of College of Public Affairs at University of Baltimore. “It does show a deep divide that perhaps the personality of Donald Trump and the direction the party has gone is no longer a consensus in that party.”With the vote coming so close to the end of Trump’s term, the potential trial and vote on the impeachment in the Senate would likely happen after President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as president and could take away some of Trump’s perks of being a former president.“Presidents get a couple hundred thousand dollars a year stipend for the rest of their lives. They get a travel budget, some of them get GSA-funded office space, computers support staff,” Wehle said. “The Constitution does include a provision for essentially banning Donald trump from running in 2024, some people believe that would be important.”But second to the political fallout, Wehle says many lawmakers see this as a way to make a statement about the future.“That this kind of insurrection is not OK and it’s not going to be tolerated in America,” she said.Hartley says this situation has the potential to lead to a political realignment that could totally reframe one or both parties.

Vice President Mike Pence will not invoke the 25th Amendment, which would start the process of removing President Donald Trump from office.

Pence sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Tuesday night.

This means the House will move forward with impeachment proceedings Wednesday, making it the first time a president has been impeached twice while in office.

Legal and political analysts say this is a situation like we’ve never seen for many reasons and more is at stake here than just a change of power.

“This is not a red versus blue moment. This is a we the people moment,” said Kim Wehle, a legal analyst from the University of Baltimore.

And a moment that’s never happened before in the history of our country. Wednesday morning, the House of Representatives plan to vote on an article of impeachment against Trump for the second time in his term for inciting insurrection during the attack on the U.S. Capitol last week.

Whele said this time is different.

“Many prosecutors believe the widespread video evidence, the president’s statement before and after the incident this is not a complicated, and nuanced case unlike the first impeachment,” Wehle said.

The first impeachment vote split down party lines, but this time, several Republicans have said they are considering voting in favor of impeachment.

“This indicates to us that some of the members of the Republican Party really are probably voting on principle here that they really believe the president did something seriously wrong,” said Roger Hartley, dean of College of Public Affairs at University of Baltimore. “It does show a deep divide that perhaps the personality of Donald Trump and the direction the party has gone is no longer a consensus in that party.”

With the vote coming so close to the end of Trump’s term, the potential trial and vote on the impeachment in the Senate would likely happen after President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as president and could take away some of Trump’s perks of being a former president.

“Presidents get a couple hundred thousand dollars a year stipend for the rest of their lives. They get a travel budget, some of them get GSA-funded office space, computers support staff,” Wehle said. “The Constitution does include a provision for essentially banning Donald trump from running in 2024, some people believe that would be important.”

But second to the political fallout, Wehle says many lawmakers see this as a way to make a statement about the future.

“That this kind of insurrection is not OK and it’s not going to be tolerated in America,” she said.

Hartley says this situation has the potential to lead to a political realignment that could totally reframe one or both parties.

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